Meet a Local Dairyman

Island Fresh-Buy Local, It MattersA mission of Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is to encourage and support local ag products. To that end, we are featuring Big Isle food producers promoted in the local Hawai‘i Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) campaign, “Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters.”

Every few weeks, we will showcase one of the 12 different food producers featured in the campaign, along with a handy recipe using their product. These farmers, ranchers and aquaculturists hail from Hawi to Ka‘u and from Kona to Hilo. One of them could be your friend…

By supporting our local food producers, we get fresh and better-tasting products. We also strengthen our economy and community, while helping preserve open space. Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters!

Ed Boteilho, head of Cloverleaf DairyCloverleaf Dairy
Ed is the Mind Behind the Milk

Children visiting the North Kohala dairy farm call him, “Uncle Ed.” He’s the kind man who teaches them about caring for cows, “so that they can take care of us.”

Ed Boteilho, head of Cloverleaf Dairy, operates his family farm on slightly more than a thousand acres at Upolu Point. At this northernmost point on the Big Island, you can see Maui and Kaho‘olawe just across the ocean.

Ed’s cows relax in the pasture between twice-a-day milkings to provide a steady supply of fresh milk. The farm has been in operation for 50 years. A third-generation farmer, Ed plans to keep it running so that Hawai‘i Island families will always be able to taste the difference of fresh, local milk!

Enjoy Local Flavors
An Ono Recipe to Savor the Freshness

Island Fresh milk is the purest, freshest and most complete locally produced food available. The processing of milk helps to retard spoilage and to distribute its nutritional components uniformly throughout the liquid—it is not a product of human engineering or fabrication. The processing is done only to ensure its quality and safety to the consumer. Island Fresh milk must pass laboratory test to comply with federal and state health, safety and purity standards.

Recipe: Island Fresh Bread Pudding

“Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters” is funded in part by the County of Hawaii Department of Research & Development. The campaign was produced by the Hawai‘i Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) and the University of Hawai‘i College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources (CTAHR) to help increase demand for, and familiarity with, locally grown commodities.

For info on more Hawai‘i food products, visit http://hawaii.gov/hdoa/add/products-database.

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Meet a Local Farmer: Apiary is Pure and Sweet

Island Fresh-Buy Local, It MattersA mission of Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is to encourage and support local ag products. To that end, we are featuring Big Isle food producers promoted in the local Hawai‘i Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) campaign, “Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters.”

Every few weeks, we will showcase one of the 12 different food producers featured in the campaign, along with a handy recipe using their product. These farmers, ranchers and aquaculturists hail from Hawi to Ka‘u and from Kona to Hilo. One of them could be your friend…

By supporting our local food producers, we get fresh and better-tasting products. We also strengthen our economy and community, while helping preserve open space. Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters!

Big Island Bees
A Homegrown Treasure

Island Fresh honeyVeteran beekeeper Garnett Puett and wife, Whendi, began harvesting honey from a handful of hives and have grown their apiary today to 3,800 hives. A fourth-generation beekeeper, Garnett has developed instincts that have become second nature. These insights help Garnett keep his bees happy – all 190 million of them!

Their busy bees collect nectar in the lush ‘ohi‘a forests and macadamia nut groves, plus from seasonal flowers on the cliffs overlooking the Kohala Coast. In doing so, they also play nature’s important role in pollinating our Big Island plants and flowers.

Together, the Puetts and their bees produce three varieties of honey, each with a distinct appearance, flavor and texture. These characteristics make them unique to Hawai‘i and definitely nō ka ‘oi!

An Ono Recipe to Savor the Freshness

“Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters” is funded in part by the County of Hawaii Department of Research & Development. The campaign was produced by the Hawai‘i Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) and the University of Hawai‘i College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources (CTAHR) to help increase demand for, and familiarity with, locally grown commodities.

For info on more Hawai‘i food products, visit http://hawaii.gov/hdoa/add/products-database.

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Meet a Local Farmer: Tomatoes Grown Green

Island Fresh-Buy Local, It MattersA mission of Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is to encourage and support local ag products. To that end, we are featuring Big Isle food producers promoted in the local Hawai‘i Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) campaign, “Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters.”

Every few weeks, we will showcase one of the 12 different food producers featured in the campaign, along with a handy recipe using their product. These farmers, ranchers and aquaculturists hail from Hawi to Ka‘u and from Kona to Hilo. One of them could be your friend…

By supporting our local food producers, we get fresh and better-tasting products. We also strengthen our economy and community, while helping preserve open space. Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters!

Kawamata Farms – Kamuela Tomatoes
Ahead of the Curve

Island Fresh tomatoesDavid Oshiro, supervisor at Kawamata Farms since 2006, helps support the family-run business through his extensive farming background. Kawamata’s tomatoes are grown hydroponically, an eco-friendly alternative to traditional soil-grown crops that allows plants to make more efficient use of valuable land and water resources.

Founded as a small operation in the 1950s, today Kawamata Farms produces 20,000 tomatoes each week. By having the foresight to take advantage of innovations in farming methods, the Kawamatas are ahead of the curve and the people of Hawai‘i are rewarded with fresh, high-quality tomatoes in local stores and restaurants.

Come talk story with Kawamata Farms at Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range!

Enjoy Local Flavors
An Ono Recipe to Savor the Freshness

Tomatoes are one of the most frequently consumed vegetables, and can be eaten raw, steamed, stewed, crushed, pureed or reduced to a sauce. Dozens of varieties are available and come in a wide range of sizes, shapes and colors. Whether eaten whole, sliced or diced, tomatoes add color and flavor to salads, salsas, soups, stews, vegetable dishes and casseroles.

Recipe: Fresh Tomato Salsa

“Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters” is funded in part by the County of Hawaii Department of Research & Development. The campaign was produced by the Hawai‘i Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) and the University of Hawai‘i College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources (CTAHR) to help increase demand for, and familiarity with, locally grown commodities.

Info on more Hawai‘i food products

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Chef Olelo pa’a Shares Thoughts on Grass-Fed Beef, Island Sustainability and Ginger Beef Soup

Chef Olelo pa'a

Chef Olelo pa‘a is giving a food demo 2-5 p.m. Friday, August 27 at the Gateway Center at the NELHA. See her prepare local, grass-fed veal and farm-raised seafood; samples are on the house! Taste of the Hawaiian Range will give away two free tickets and sell tickets at the 2-6 p.m. market.

This week we feature a guest blog by Chef Olelo pa’a Faith Ogawa. Olelo pa’a helped plan the first Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range 15 years ago because she saw the importance of producing superior, grass-fed beef to feed our island. Today, she is a sought-after private chef by Fortune 500 execs and their families and operates her business, Dining by Faith.  The girl who grew up on a Waipahu sugar plantation shares the flavors of Hawai‘i through her distinct Conscious Hawaiian Cuisine™, cooking demonstrations and Glow Hawai‘i Products.  Visit www.glowhawaii.com;  email:  glow@glowhawaii.com.

Looking Back on the First Taste
It was 15 years ago when I was approached by Milton Yamasaki, manager of the Mealani Research Station in Waimea, to assist in getting the first Taste of the Hawaiian Range going. At first I said I was too busy, but I took time to listen to what Milton had to say. I felt his compassion for the ‘aina, the ranchers and farmers.

Milton convinced me to come to the first organizational meeting; then I went to the next meeting and learned more about the cattle industry and how we could have a sustainable and nutritious beef product made right here on the island of Hawai‘i. I asked myself, “Why aren’t we producing superior, grass-fed beef in Hawai‘i?” At that time, most of the calves were shipped to the Mainland for finishing and pricing was susceptible to several uncontrollable factors, like shipping.

Soon, I felt inspired to do whatever I could to promote the idea of producing and enjoying Hawai‘i grass-fed beef. I joined the committee and we put together the first Taste of the Hawaiian Range, in conjunction with a Forage Field Day. The Field Day was an educational program for ranchers on producing grass-fed beef and the Taste educated the public, especially chefs, on using the local product.

Chef Olelo pa’a

Chef Olelo pa’a in Waimea

Local Food Boasts Superior Quality
Through the efforts of Milton and his research team at Mealani, the quality of beef produced on our island has greatly improved and today, it is superior. In fact, the quality and variety of all locally produced food is better. As a chef in Waikiki in the 1970s, I hardly used any locally grown product—everything was imported in. Today, I’m proud to use our Hawai‘i-grown food as much as I can. It is top quality and offers my clients a true taste of Hawai‘i.

The Spirit of the ‘Aina
I feel the people of the island of Hawai‘i have a pioneering spirit. It’s seen in our farmers, who are always trying to improve their product for consumers. We have several active organizations that encourage food sustainability and awareness. And we also are home to cutting edge resources like Keahole’s Natural Energy Lab Hawai‘i Authority and Waimea’s Mealani Research Station. They help foster our ag industry and the local production of food.

I feel connected to the land and I feel the island has a purpose. When I talk to the spirit of our land it tells me that it wants to grow our food and help us be sustainable. The ‘aina wants to perpetuate living off the land. It doesn’t want to be covered in concrete.

And so, I’m passionate about using local food and promoting those who work so hard to feed us.

Be Proud of our Local Food Producers
When you go to Taste of the Hawaiian Range, feel proud of the food you are eating. It was made here by caring hands and hearts to nourish you. Many local food producers will have exhibits; tell them you appreciate what they are doing. If we had more food producers, we would be eating more fresh, nutritious food and our landscape would be rich with a tapestry of farm-raised crops. If we were to eat good food, we would lower our health cost.  We will have a healthier community and less wasteful spending.

Every time I have a memory of the cattle industry in Hawai‘i, I picture the old black and white photos of the paniolo (Hawaiian Cowboys) moving the cattle into the waters at Kawaihae Harbor to be shipped to the mainland for finishing. As a chef, I feel good about using our locally grown, grass-fed beef and knowing that Hawai‘i is moving in the direction of growing more of its own food. We’ve come a long way, and I hope we can continue moving toward food sustainability. Hawai‘i Island is on the leading edge so ‘Imua!  Let’s keep moving forward!

Recipe: Waimea Ginger Beef Soba Soup

Photo credits: courtesy Chef Olelo pa’a

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Meet a Local Rancher: Sustaining The ‘Aina in Ka’u

A mission of Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is to encourage and support local ag products. To that end, we are featuring Big Isle food producers promoted in the local Hawai‘i Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) campaign, “Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters.”

Every few weeks, we will showcase one of the 12 different food producers featured in the campaign, along with a handy recipe using their product. These farmers, ranchers and aquaculturists hail from Hawi to Ka‘u and from Kona to Hilo. One of them could be your friend…

By supporting our local food producers, we get fresh and better-tasting products. We also strengthen our economy and community, while helping preserve open space. Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters!

Kuahiwi Ranch-Aloha ‘Aina Natural Beef
Salt of the Earth

Island Fresh Kuahiwi Ranch“What rancher Michelle Galimba knows about raising beef cattle she learned by experience and very hard work. When the Galimba started Kuahiwi Ranch in 1993, Michelle, her father, Al, and brother, Guy, rode horseback with Michelle through the rugged hills of Ka‘u to rope wild cattle to build their herd.

Today, the ranch spans 10,000 acres where cattle graze on lush, green pastures with supplemented grains. The result is beef that is rich in flavor and amazingly tender.

Galimba says it is a privilege to provide Hawai‘i with a really great product—something that nourishes people because it comes from the ‘aina (land).”

Island Fresh“Island Fresh-Buy Local, It Matters” is funded in part by the County of Hawaii Department of Research & Development. The campaign was produced by the Hawai‘i Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) and the University of Hawai‘i College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources (CTAHR) to help increase demand for, and familiarity with, locally grown commodities.

Enjoy Local Flavors
An Ono Recipe to Savor the Freshness

For info on more Hawai‘i food products, visit
http://hawaii.gov/hdoa/add/products-database.

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