Taste 2016 Diverts 92% of Waste from Landfill, Cooking 101 Recipes Posted

Waste Diagram

Total wastes generated at 2016 Taste of the Hawaiian Range.
Credit: Courtesy Dr. Norman Arancon/UH-Hilo

Recycling efforts at the 2016 Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range diverted a whopping 1,395.71 pounds of waste from the landfill. A waste total of 1,513.79 pounds was generated with 92.2 percent of it diverted or “recovered” as compostables, mixed recyclables, HI-5 redemption and food waste that was distributed to local piggeries. The adjacent diagram shows the breakdown of total waste by pounds and percent.

Recycling Taste of the Hawaiian Range 2016

Kanu O Ka ‘Aina students staffed the many waste stations.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

The County of Hawai’i spearheaded the massive Zero Waste effort, which was assisted by students at Kanu o Ka ‘Aina School. Honoka‘a Intermediate/High School and UH-Hilo. Dr. Norman Arancon of the University of Hawai‘i compiled the waste report and supervised the weighing of the waste.

The 21st annual event at Hilton Waikoloa Village proved to hundreds of attendees and participating culinarians that pasture-raised beef tastes good and can be used to make satisfying dishes. A wide variety of beef cuts —everything from tongue to tail—were assigned and prepared at 29 culinary stations, plus pork, lamb, mutton and goat.

Food at Taste of the Hawaiian Range 2016

A wide variety of meat cuts were used to tantalize attendees.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

In addition, there were 40 product/educational displays. Some booths shared tastes of goodies, like honey and balsamic vinegar, while others offered compelling agricultural displays and informational handouts on topics like Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death.

Culinary student component

Sheraton Kona at Taste of the Hawaiian Range 2016

One of several culinary stations positioned outdoors on the Lagoon Lanai was the Sheraton Kona.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

Hawai‘i Community College (HCC) culinary students from both East and West Hawai‘i helped chefs and product booths dish out thousands of tasty samples. They included 21 students and three instructors from West Hawai‘i and 52 students, six graduates and four instructors from East Hawai‘i.

Students also were assigned meat cuts to prepare and serve at their own culinary stations. Hilo students were assigned tripe and served Munudo. “It’s a Mexican stew that’s known as a hangover remedy,” smiled Brian Hirata, chef instructor of culinary arts in Hilo.

Food producer Hawaii Lassi

Food producer Hawaii Lassi of Akaml Foods offered a fruity yogurt drink.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

Those studying Asian cookery at HCC in Kona prepared Indian Lamb Curry while those in the European class concocted Lamb Shish-Ka-Bobs. Both schools also offered a selection of desserts, including the popular chocolate-dipped cookies by Chef Fernand Guiot’s Kona students.

Educational activities open to all

Luisa Castro of the UH-Hilo College of Continuing Education and Community Service

Luisa Castro of the UH-Hilo College of Continuing Education and Community Service shared info on class offerings such as food preservation.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

Pre-gala activities were geared to students and home cooks. The first was a live demonstration, “Beef Carcass Butchering and Product Valuation.” Dr. Dale Woerner and Dr. Keith Belk of Colorado State University showed how a half-beef carcass is butchered into products while sharing the characteristics of each. The well-received demonstration instructed future chefs and food service personnel how to best utilize the whole carcass of pasture-raised cattle. In addition, the presentation was of value to the home cook wanting to learn where beef cuts come from.

Cooking Pasture-Raised Beef 101 Recipes

Students at HCC-Hilo

Students at HCC-Hilo finish banana and chocolate chip cookies with a honey butter drizzle.

O’ahu chefs Kevin Hanney and J Schoonover of 12th Ave Grill and Kokohead Cafe demonstrated how to use beef tongue and beef short ribs during Pasture-Raised Beef Cooking 101. Attendees enjoyed samples. Click on these links for their recipes: Red Wine Braised Paniolo Beef Tongue with Sweet Pepper Soffrito and Coconut-Braised Big Island Beef Shortribs. NEED these recipe names LINKED TO WEBSITE PLZ.

HawCC culinary students

HawCC culinary students gather around the educational demo on beef butchering and product valuation.
Credit: Jeff Ikeda

Mahalo to the many others who helped make Taste a success! With a mission to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and support of locally produced ag products, Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations. Find a list of the 2016 supporters and participants, details on the Mealani Research Station—where Taste began—plus where to get grass-fed beef on the Big Isle AND recipes, at www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com.

Share

Throwback to the First ʻTaste’

The date was September 13, 1996. The Waimea event began with a Forage Field Day at the Mealani Research Station and continued with the evening “Celebrating a Taste of the Hawaiian Range” at the Kahilu Town Hall. Both activities had an educational focus and were presented by a founding committee.

Committee of Seven Sets Up First Taste

Chef Olelo pa'a Ogawa

Chef Olelo pa’a Ogawa

Originating the program was Milton Yamasaki, ag research technician at the UH Mealani Research Station and Glenn Fukumoto, county extension agent-livestock program of UH-CTAHR. Other members and their duties included Chef Olelo pa‘a Ogawa, culinary; Gene Erger, marketing; rancher Rick Habien, producers; Kulana Foods, processing; and extension agent Burton Smith, education.

Education Key to Activities

Milton Yamasaki

Milton Yamasaki

“The goal of Taste was to create a collaboration between ranchers, food handlers and chefs to create good food,” says Yamasaki, former Mealani manager. The retired ag research technician adds that the day’s events were educational on three levels: to show ranchers how to produce and market a consistent quality, grass-fed product; to have chefs work with the product while using the entire animal; and to show consumers that when grass-fed beef is prepared properly, it is a good product.

“By getting everybody involved in the product—creating, preparing and enjoying—the hope was chefs and consumers would purchase it,” Yamasaki details.

Forage Field Day Presenters

More than 60 ranchers and food handlers—meat processors, food and beverage professionals, chefs, butchers—attended the 1996 Forage Field Day. Speakers and topics:

Evening Taste Attracts Public

The first evening Taste at the then Kahilu Town Hall was modest in size when compared to the enormity of today’s event which sprawls both inside and out of the Hilton Waikoloa Village. There was just over 20 culinary/display booths, about a fourth of what is offered today.

Glen Fukumoto

Glen Fukumoto

“We had no funding for the (evening) food show; our committee took a risk that the ticket revenue was going to cover the costs of the expenses,” shares Glen Fukumoto, county extension agent-livestock program of UH-CTAHR.  “If not, we were all ready to pay from our own pockets.  At that first ‘taste event,’ no one envisioned that the event would be a spark and part of the revolution—a reawakening of the local food movement that we see today.”

Who Was Cooking

Kuhio Grille has the distinction of participating in all 20 Tastes, with Roy’s Waikoloa Bar & Grill showing up for 19 events. Find the list of the original 16 participating restaurants in August’s Taste It blog: http://www.tasteofthehawaiianrange.com/blog/index.php/2015/08/04/kuhio-grille-participates-at-every-taste/

Food Booths Offer Sampling

The six original food booths included:

  • Tropical Dreams Ice Cream
  • Kamuela Liquor Store/Alvin Wakayama
  • Cook’s Discoveries/Patti Cook
  • Sugar ‘n Spice
  • Excelsior Dairy, Inc.
  • Val’s Party Pleasure
Share

Taste Zero Waste Effort Diverts 97% of Discards from Landfill, Cooking 101 Recipes Posted

Kanu O Ka ‘Aina students staffed discard stations. Photos by Fern Gavelek.

Kanu O Ka ‘Aina students staffed discard stations. Photos by Fern Gavelek.

The results are in and recycling efforts at the 2014 Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range diverted 1,642.6 pounds of waste from the landfill. A total of 1700.4 pounds of waste was generated during the event with 96.6 percent of it recovered as compostables, mixed recyclables, HI-5 redemption or food waste that was given to local piggeries.

The County of Hawai’i spearheaded the massive Zero Waste effort, which was assisted by students at Kanu o Ka ‘Aina School. Dr. Norman Arancon of the University of Hawai‘i compiled the waste report.

Hilton Waikoloa Village dished out tasty Beef Tongue Pho.

Hilton Waikoloa Village dished out tasty Beef Tongue Pho.

The 19th annual event at Hilton Waikoloa Village proved to over 2000 attendees that pasture-raised beef tastes good and can be used to make satisfying dishes. A wide variety of beef cuts —everything from tongue to tail—were featured at 30 culinary stations, plus pork, lamb, mutton and goat.

In addition, there were 28 product/educational displays. Some booths shared tastes of goodies, like PAVA sherbet, while others offered compelling agricultural displays.

Nearly 90 Hawaii Community College culinary students participated.

Nearly 90 Hawaii Community College culinary students participated.

Hawai‘i Community College culinary students from both East and West Hawai‘i helped chefs and product booths dish out hundreds of tastes. They included 25 students and two instructors from West Hawai‘i and 63 students and four instructors from East Hawai‘i. The students also were assigned meat cuts to prepare for their own culinary stations.

The pre-gala activities included a public Cooking Pasture-Raised Beef 101 demonstration by Chef Peter Abarcar Jr. and a discussion geared to culinary students and food service professionals on Hawai‘i’s beef industry by local UH livestock expert Glen Fukumoto.

Attendees to Fukumoto’s “A Primer for Local Beef” learned about the history of the beef industry in Hawaii and looked at grass-fed beef’s current challenges regarding competitive pricing, supply and demand, Big Island slaughterhouse capacity and recent years of drought. In addition, Fukumoto delved into local meat quality through the years, based on his 30 years of research.

Chef Peter Abarcar Jr. led the Cooking 101 demonstration.

Chef Peter Abarcar Jr. led the Cooking 101 demonstration.

Chef Peter Abarcar Jr. of the Hapuna Prince Beach Hotel shares his recipes from Pasture-Raised Beef Cooking 101: Pipikaula Brine, Kona Coffee and Sundried Tomato Vinaigrette, Cowboy Salad and Chinese Style Oxtail and Radish Stew.

Mahalo to the many others who helped make Taste a success! With a mission to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and

The Mauna Lani Bay Hotel and Ponoholo Ranch teamed up out on the Lagoon Lanai to serve beef tri tip.

The Mauna Lani Bay Hotel and Ponoholo Ranch teamed up out on the Lagoon Lanai to serve beef tri tip.

support of locally produced ag products, Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations. Find a list of the 2014 supporters and participants, details on the Mealani Research Station—where Taste began—plus where to get grass-fed beef on the Big Isle AND recipes, at www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com. See you next year for our 20th annual event!

Share

Zero Waste Effort Diverts All Discards from Landfill, Recipe Shared for Popular Honey Ginger Ale

Mahina Café offered a mini laulau complete with taro and haupia at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Mahina Café offered a mini laulau complete with taro and haupia

The 18th annual Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range at Hilton Waikoloa Village proved to over 2100 attendees that grass fed beef tastes good and can be used to make a wide assortment of satisfying dishes. A wide variety of beef cuts—everything from tongue to tail—were featured at 35 culinary stations, plus pork, lamb, mutton and goat.

Kulana Foods offered Pipikaula Poke at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Kulana Foods offered Pipikaula Poke

In addition, there were 36 product/educational displays. Some booths shared tastes of goodies, like pipikaula poke and PAVA smoothies, while others offered compelling displays ranging from heirloom squash to solar cooking.

A handy Graze Your Way at Taste map again guided attendees through the event. Info and recipes collected from booths could be conveniently stowed in canvas Taste bags that were given to each attendee.

Attendees raved about their fave “tastes” on Facebook, including the Honey Ginger Ale, a collaborative creation by HawCC Ag Program and the UHH Adopt a Beehive program. The recipe is here.

A 636-pound pumpkin with Cinderella at Recycle Hawaii’s booth

A 636-pound pumpkin with Cinderella at Recycle Hawaii’s booth

Another big hit at this year’s Taste was a 636-pound pumpkin that was grown using kitchen scraps composted by The Bokashi Bucket system. Complete with a costumed “Cinderella,” the display was part of Recycle Hawaii’s booth

Recycle Hawaii also helped with the event’s zero waste effort. Attendees discarded their compostable serving ware and leftovers at 15 waste stations, assisted by students at Kanu o Ka ‘Aina School.

“The kids were super great to work with and it was gratifying to see that they got what we were doing,” says Kristine Kubat, zero waste coordinator for Recycle Hawaii.

Kubat reports that “everything we recovered got recycled, redeemed or composted. Northing was taken to the landfill.”

Percentage breakdown of discards captured for zero waste effort at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Percentage breakdown of discards captured for zero waste effort

According to Dr. Norman Arancon of the University of Hawai‘i, total waste (discards captured) was 2,852 pounds, of which 49.2% were compostables, 8.8% were HI-5, 6.1% were mixed recyclables and 35.9% were food wastes (see graph).

A slew of Hawai‘i Community College culinary students from both East and West Hawai‘i helped chefs and product booths dish out hundreds of tastes. They included 26 students and two instructors from West Hawai‘i and 61 students and five instructors from East Hawai‘i.

HawCC Culinary students at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

HawCC Culinary students helped chefs and also staffed stations presented by both the West and East Hawai‘i campuses.

Mahalo to the many others who helped make Taste a success! With a mission to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and support of locally produced ag products, Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations. Find a list of the 2013 supporters and participants, details on the Mealani Research Station—where Taste began—plus where to get grass-fed beef on the Big Isle AND recipes, at www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com.

Click here for the Honey Ginger Ale recipe.

Share

New Chefs, Product Booths Debut at 2013 Taste

There’s something for everyone at the 18th annual Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range and Agriculture Festival 6-8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4 at the Hilton Waikoloa Village:

  • Enjoy fresh food using local ingredients—starring forage-fed meats—by 35 chefs
  • Taste local ag and value-added products and meet the folks who produce them
  • Browse among ag-related educational displays

Culinary Newbies

Chef Ronnie Nasuti

Chef Ronnie Nasuti

Five of the 35 participating restaurants are Taste first timers. Like the rest of the Taste chefs, they are assigned to prepare 100 pounds of a certain cut of grass-fed beef—or lamb, mutton, goat or commercial and feral pork.

Pork is on the menu for two new participants. The Sheraton Keauhou Bay Resort & Spa is partnering to use commercial pork with Kamehameha Schools. Chef Cory Nazara of Mahina Café in Captain Cook is serving her version of kalua pork.

Debuting from O’ahu is Chef Ronnie Nasuti of Tiki’s Grill & Bar in Waikiki, who is preparing mutton; and Chef Mark Noguchi of Pili Hawai’i and TASTE Table in Honolulu, who is assigned to prepare beef skirt.

Newly opened Pueo’s Osteria in Waikoloa Village is also making a first appearance at this year’s event and preparing lamb. Chef Jim Babian, a staunch supporter of local ranchers and farmers, owns the new Waikoloa Village Restaurant. Chef Babian, who recently served as executive chef at Four Seasons Resort Hualalai, is no stranger to Taste and last year presented Grass-Fed Beef Cooking 101 to a sell-out crowd.

Booths and Displays

Hawaiian Granola Company

Hawaiian Granola Company debuts at Taste 2013

In addition to “grazing” at a host of culinary stations, festival goers can enjoy samples from a variety of Hawai‘i’s local food producers offering tastes of their products. Also on display are ag-related educational exhibits.

Barbara Andersen of Hawaiian Granola Company debuts tastes of her original recipe breakfast treat at this year’s Taste. The Hilo resident started making granola for guests at her Shipman House Bed and Breakfast in 1997, focusing on using local macadamia nuts, plus mac nut honey and oil.

Hawaiian Granola Company also concocts recipes using island-sourced ginger, coconut and coffee. Andersen says the granola is “pure, with few other ingredients,” including brown cane sugar, vanilla and oats. “I use nice, chewy oats that have a heft to them, which gives granola a nice body.”

The Mauna Kea Beach Hotel serves Hawaiian Granola at its Sunday brunch and it’s sold at isle retailers.

Got Pork?

Pork Industry booth at the Hawaii State Farm Fair.

Pork Industry booth at the Hawaii State Farm Fair.

On the heels of a recent, new event that promotes heritage breed pigs, Cochon Island, the Hawaii Pork Industry Assoc. (HPIA) returns to Taste with an educational booth that offers tastes of char sui and smoked commercial pork.

Dr. Halina Zaleski, extension specialist with UH Manoa’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, says the booth provides info on pork’s nutritional value and how to best prepare it.

“People tend to overcook pork; there’s no need to make it into shoe leather,” she says. “It should be cooked to 145 degrees and can still have some pink to it; it should be juicy.”

The booth will also be staffed by Big Isle residents Ron and Daphne McKeehan of Ahualoa Hog Farm and Ryan Okimoto, livestock technician at UH-Hilo’s Panaewa Farm.

With a goal to educate and support all 200 of Hawai’i’s pork producers, the HIPA also promotes the use of pork.

Get Your Tickets!

Chef Hubert Des Marais

Chef Hubert Des Marais

Pre-Taste activities include a culinary demo, with sampling, on how to use and prepare 100 percent pasture-raised beef. Time is 3 p.m. for the 2013 installment of Grass-Fed Beef Cooking 101 and the fee is $10. This year’s guest presenter is Executive Chef Hubert Des Marais of The Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii, who will be preparing boneless brisket and tongue.

For details on purchasing tickets online or islandwide for the evening Taste and Cooking 101 demo, visit Taste of the Hawaiian Range. Taste tickets remain priced at $40 presale and $60 at the door. Watch for ticket giveaways and event updates on Facebook at Taste of the Hawaiian Range and Twitter #TasteHI. For general event information, phone (808) 969-8228.

Hawai’i residents can take advantage of Hilton Waikoloa Village’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range Package with rates starting at $229 per room on Oct. 4 that includes two tickets for Taste. For details, and to book a stay under an exclusive Taste of the Hawaiian Range room package (code TSH), visit http://bit.ly/14wUunL or call 1-800-HILTONS.

Share