Taste 2016 Diverts 96% of Waste from Landfill, Cooking 101 Recipes Posted

Waste Diagram

Total wastes generated at 2016 Taste of the Hawaiian Range.
Credit: Courtesy Dr. Norman Arancon/UH-Hilo

Recycling efforts at the 2016 Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range diverted a whopping 1,456.3 pounds of waste from the landfill. A waste total of 1,513.79 pounds was generated with 96.2 percent of it diverted or “recovered” as compostables, mixed recyclables, HI-5 redemption and food waste that was distributed to local piggeries. The adjacent diagram shows the breakdown of total waste by pounds and percent.

Recycling Taste of the Hawaiian Range 2016

Kanu O Ka ‘Aina students staffed the many waste stations.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

The County of Hawai’i spearheaded the massive Zero Waste effort, which was assisted by students at Kanu o Ka ‘Aina School. Honoka‘a Intermediate/High School and UH-Hilo. Dr. Norman Arancon of the University of Hawai‘i compiled the waste report and supervised the weighing of the waste.

The 21st annual event at Hilton Waikoloa Village proved to hundreds of attendees and participating culinarians that pasture-raised beef tastes good and can be used to make satisfying dishes. A wide variety of beef cuts —everything from tongue to tail—were assigned and prepared at 29 culinary stations, plus pork, lamb, mutton and goat.

Food at Taste of the Hawaiian Range 2016

A wide variety of meat cuts were used to tantalize attendees.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

In addition, there were 40 product/educational displays. Some booths shared tastes of goodies, like honey and balsamic vinegar, while others offered compelling agricultural displays and informational handouts on topics like Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death.

Culinary student component

Sheraton Kona at Taste of the Hawaiian Range 2016

One of several culinary stations positioned outdoors on the Lagoon Lanai was the Sheraton Kona.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

Hawai‘i Community College (HCC) culinary students from both East and West Hawai‘i helped chefs and product booths dish out thousands of tasty samples. They included 21 students and three instructors from West Hawai‘i and 52 students, six graduates and four instructors from East Hawai‘i.

Students also were assigned meat cuts to prepare and serve at their own culinary stations. Hilo students were assigned tripe and served Munudo. “It’s a Mexican stew that’s known as a hangover remedy,” smiled Brian Hirata, chef instructor of culinary arts in Hilo.

Food producer Hawaii Lassi

Food producer Hawaii Lassi of Akaml Foods offered a fruity yogurt drink.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

Those studying Asian cookery at HCC in Kona prepared Indian Lamb Curry while those in the European class concocted Lamb Shish-Ka-Bobs. Both schools also offered a selection of desserts, including the popular chocolate-dipped cookies by Chef Fernand Guiot’s Kona students.

Educational activities open to all

Luisa Castro of the UH-Hilo College of Continuing Education and Community Service

Luisa Castro of the UH-Hilo College of Continuing Education and Community Service shared info on class offerings such as food preservation.
Credit: Fern Gavelek

Pre-gala activities were geared to students and home cooks. The first was a live demonstration, “Beef Carcass Butchering and Product Valuation.” Dr. Dale Woerner and Dr. Keith Belk of Colorado State University showed how a half-beef carcass is butchered into products while sharing the characteristics of each. The well-received demonstration instructed future chefs and food service personnel how to best utilize the whole carcass of pasture-raised cattle. In addition, the presentation was of value to the home cook wanting to learn where beef cuts come from.

Cooking Pasture-Raised Beef 101 Recipes

Students at HCC-Hilo

Students at HCC-Hilo finish banana and chocolate chip cookies with a honey butter drizzle.

O’ahu chefs Kevin Hanney and J Schoonover of 12th Ave Grill and Kokohead Cafe demonstrated how to use beef tongue and beef short ribs during Pasture-Raised Beef Cooking 101. Attendees enjoyed samples. Click on these links for their recipes: Red Wine Braised Paniolo Beef Tongue with Sweet Pepper Soffrito and Coconut-Braised Big Island Beef Shortribs. NEED these recipe names LINKED TO WEBSITE PLZ.

HawCC culinary students

HawCC culinary students gather around the educational demo on beef butchering and product valuation.
Credit: Jeff Ikeda

Mahalo to the many others who helped make Taste a success! With a mission to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and support of locally produced ag products, Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations. Find a list of the 2016 supporters and participants, details on the Mealani Research Station—where Taste began—plus where to get grass-fed beef on the Big Isle AND recipes, at www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com.

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Isle Educational Opportunities Support Agriculture

Want to be a beekeeper or try out goat and sheep production? Perhaps you dream of producing a new color of anthurium? Or maybe you want to dump the office job so you can commercially grow veggies?

What you need to know is at your fingertips as a variety of educational opportunities are available on Hawai‘i Island for prospective ranchers, farmers and horticulturists.

College Degrees in Agriculture

Tropical farming and beekeeping certificates, plus bachelor degrees in a variety of agricultural specialties, can be earned at the University of Hawaii-Hilo. Areas of concentration include livestock production, aquaculture, tropical horticulture, plus tropical plant science and agroecology.   For the 2016-2017 catalog of degrees and certificates, visit https://hilo.hawaii.edu/catalog/degrees-and-certificates-offered.html.

Hands-on Training

The Kohala Center BFRDP Cgraduates-

Graduates of the 2015-2016 cohort of Kohala Center’s Beginning Farmer-Rancher Development Program.

With a goal to encourage island food sustainability, The Kohala Center has been offering the Beginning Farmer-Rancher Development Program since 2012 and has completed five cohorts. This program seeks to “motivate and train” the next generation of farmers during a seven-month course. It covers subjects like managing soil health and fertility, crop nutrition, pest management and business planning during 70 hours of class work, hands-on field days and farm tours. The Kohala Center also has a 10-acre demonstration site to provide apprenticeship opportunities. Find info at http://kohalacenter.org/farmertraining.

Community College Ag Credentials

Ag Farm

Students learn agricultural skills through classes at UH Hawai‘i Community College-Hilo.
Credit: HCC-Hilo

Hawai‘i Community College in Hilo provides curricula preparing students for entrepreneurship or employment within the fields of agribusiness, horticulture, livestock, flowers and foliage, plus orchard crop industries. Students can earn credentials such as a certificate of achievement, a farm worker certificate of competency or an associate in applied science. Find information at https://hawaii.hawaii.edu/agriculture.

Long Distance Learning and Publications

The UH at Manoa College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) offers distance learning agricultural courses, plus publications and videos on topics accessible to Hawai‘i Island residents. Find agricultural courses (listed with the prefix NREM, PEPS or TPSS) at http://cms.ctahr.hawaii.edu/disted/resources/distanceedcourses.aspx. Search for publications and videos of interest at http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/site/Info.aspx.

CTAHR’s Cooperative Extension Service has numerous programs and information covering a wealth of agricultural topics; get started at http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/site/Extprograms.aspx. In addition, there are CTAHR-related websites dedicated to providing farmer outreach on specific commodities; they include http://hawaiicoffee.weebly.com and http://ctahrmacadamia.weebly.com.

Crop and Trade Associations

Farmer wannabes can also get information from local agricultural organizations, like the Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, who meet monthly for informative presentations and networking. HTFG and other specific agricultural trade organizations host annual conferences with educational speakers, breakout sessions and farm tours.

Food Preservation

Master Preserver

Earn a master food preserver certificate through UH Hilo College of Continuing Education and Community Service.
Credit: CCECS

In addition to growing food, some farmers are interested in getting into the production of value-added products. The UH Hilo College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) periodically offers a master food preserver certificate program to train students in developing jams and jellies, canning, pickling and fermenting, drying, freezing and the art of charcuterie. Find info at http://bit.ly/1TZn1BS.

Non-credit Instruction

Also available through CCECS in the past or coming up in the future are non-credit courses in agriculture and food preservation. Offerings have or will include Plant Propagation, Pruning, Agroforestry for Hawai‘i’s Farm & Ranches, Beekeeping and Ecological Farm Design. For the current schedule of classes, visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/academics/ccecs/registration/index.php.

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Taste Zero Waste Effort Diverts 97% of Discards from Landfill, Cooking 101 Recipes Posted

Kanu O Ka ‘Aina students staffed discard stations. Photos by Fern Gavelek.

Kanu O Ka ‘Aina students staffed discard stations. Photos by Fern Gavelek.

The results are in and recycling efforts at the 2014 Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range diverted 1,642.6 pounds of waste from the landfill. A total of 1700.4 pounds of waste was generated during the event with 96.6 percent of it recovered as compostables, mixed recyclables, HI-5 redemption or food waste that was given to local piggeries.

The County of Hawai’i spearheaded the massive Zero Waste effort, which was assisted by students at Kanu o Ka ‘Aina School. Dr. Norman Arancon of the University of Hawai‘i compiled the waste report.

Hilton Waikoloa Village dished out tasty Beef Tongue Pho.

Hilton Waikoloa Village dished out tasty Beef Tongue Pho.

The 19th annual event at Hilton Waikoloa Village proved to over 2000 attendees that pasture-raised beef tastes good and can be used to make satisfying dishes. A wide variety of beef cuts —everything from tongue to tail—were featured at 30 culinary stations, plus pork, lamb, mutton and goat.

In addition, there were 28 product/educational displays. Some booths shared tastes of goodies, like PAVA sherbet, while others offered compelling agricultural displays.

Nearly 90 Hawaii Community College culinary students participated.

Nearly 90 Hawaii Community College culinary students participated.

Hawai‘i Community College culinary students from both East and West Hawai‘i helped chefs and product booths dish out hundreds of tastes. They included 25 students and two instructors from West Hawai‘i and 63 students and four instructors from East Hawai‘i. The students also were assigned meat cuts to prepare for their own culinary stations.

The pre-gala activities included a public Cooking Pasture-Raised Beef 101 demonstration by Chef Peter Abarcar Jr. and a discussion geared to culinary students and food service professionals on Hawai‘i’s beef industry by local UH livestock expert Glen Fukumoto.

Attendees to Fukumoto’s “A Primer for Local Beef” learned about the history of the beef industry in Hawaii and looked at grass-fed beef’s current challenges regarding competitive pricing, supply and demand, Big Island slaughterhouse capacity and recent years of drought. In addition, Fukumoto delved into local meat quality through the years, based on his 30 years of research.

Chef Peter Abarcar Jr. led the Cooking 101 demonstration.

Chef Peter Abarcar Jr. led the Cooking 101 demonstration.

Chef Peter Abarcar Jr. of the Hapuna Prince Beach Hotel shares his recipes from Pasture-Raised Beef Cooking 101: Pipikaula Brine, Kona Coffee and Sundried Tomato Vinaigrette, Cowboy Salad and Chinese Style Oxtail and Radish Stew.

Mahalo to the many others who helped make Taste a success! With a mission to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and

The Mauna Lani Bay Hotel and Ponoholo Ranch teamed up out on the Lagoon Lanai to serve beef tri tip.

The Mauna Lani Bay Hotel and Ponoholo Ranch teamed up out on the Lagoon Lanai to serve beef tri tip.

support of locally produced ag products, Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations. Find a list of the 2014 supporters and participants, details on the Mealani Research Station—where Taste began—plus where to get grass-fed beef on the Big Isle AND recipes, at www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com. See you next year for our 20th annual event!

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Zero Waste Effort Diverts All Discards from Landfill, Recipe Shared for Popular Honey Ginger Ale

Mahina Café offered a mini laulau complete with taro and haupia at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Mahina Café offered a mini laulau complete with taro and haupia

The 18th annual Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range at Hilton Waikoloa Village proved to over 2100 attendees that grass fed beef tastes good and can be used to make a wide assortment of satisfying dishes. A wide variety of beef cuts—everything from tongue to tail—were featured at 35 culinary stations, plus pork, lamb, mutton and goat.

Kulana Foods offered Pipikaula Poke at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Kulana Foods offered Pipikaula Poke

In addition, there were 36 product/educational displays. Some booths shared tastes of goodies, like pipikaula poke and PAVA smoothies, while others offered compelling displays ranging from heirloom squash to solar cooking.

A handy Graze Your Way at Taste map again guided attendees through the event. Info and recipes collected from booths could be conveniently stowed in canvas Taste bags that were given to each attendee.

Attendees raved about their fave “tastes” on Facebook, including the Honey Ginger Ale, a collaborative creation by HawCC Ag Program and the UHH Adopt a Beehive program. The recipe is here.

A 636-pound pumpkin with Cinderella at Recycle Hawaii’s booth

A 636-pound pumpkin with Cinderella at Recycle Hawaii’s booth

Another big hit at this year’s Taste was a 636-pound pumpkin that was grown using kitchen scraps composted by The Bokashi Bucket system. Complete with a costumed “Cinderella,” the display was part of Recycle Hawaii’s booth

Recycle Hawaii also helped with the event’s zero waste effort. Attendees discarded their compostable serving ware and leftovers at 15 waste stations, assisted by students at Kanu o Ka ‘Aina School.

“The kids were super great to work with and it was gratifying to see that they got what we were doing,” says Kristine Kubat, zero waste coordinator for Recycle Hawaii.

Kubat reports that “everything we recovered got recycled, redeemed or composted. Northing was taken to the landfill.”

Percentage breakdown of discards captured for zero waste effort at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Percentage breakdown of discards captured for zero waste effort

According to Dr. Norman Arancon of the University of Hawai‘i, total waste (discards captured) was 2,852 pounds, of which 49.2% were compostables, 8.8% were HI-5, 6.1% were mixed recyclables and 35.9% were food wastes (see graph).

A slew of Hawai‘i Community College culinary students from both East and West Hawai‘i helped chefs and product booths dish out hundreds of tastes. They included 26 students and two instructors from West Hawai‘i and 61 students and five instructors from East Hawai‘i.

HawCC Culinary students at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

HawCC Culinary students helped chefs and also staffed stations presented by both the West and East Hawai‘i campuses.

Mahalo to the many others who helped make Taste a success! With a mission to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and support of locally produced ag products, Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations. Find a list of the 2013 supporters and participants, details on the Mealani Research Station—where Taste began—plus where to get grass-fed beef on the Big Isle AND recipes, at www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com.

Click here for the Honey Ginger Ale recipe.

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Grazing Galore at Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Mealani Blueberries

Everyone loves Mealani's blueberries

Officially proclaimed by Hawai’i County as Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range Day, Sept. 21st offered perfect “grazing” weather for hungry attendees at the 17th annual agriculture festival that sprawled both inside and out of the Hilton Waikoloa Village. Food was on everyone’s mind-and plenty of it.

Kamehameha Schools

Kamehameha Schools prepared a steamship round of beef huli-style (rotisserie) into tasty wraps and sliders

Event-goers shared their grazing experience on Taste’s facebook page, describing a host of favorite culinary offerings. There were many nods for the steamship round of beef prepared on the outdoor spit into tasty Paniolo Wraps and Pipi Huli on ‘Ulu Rolls by Kamehameha Schools, Another popular item was the savory Island-Braised Lamb Sliders (see recipe) by Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai.

Nancy Sweatt of Kona said she had several favorites: “Lava Lava (Beach Club’s) Top Round beef, Pu’uwai (Ranch) Lamb was the best! I loved the Tongue by 12th Ave Grill.”

Earls Tripe Sushi

The Tripe Tummy Rolls by Earl's were a big hit

“Best dish goes to Earl’s Tummy Rolls,” posted Angelia Elarco. “Who would (have) ever thought of tripe sushi? LOL. But I heard the dish that was wrapped like a laulau with the truffle sauce was amazing (beef cheek by The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai’i) … Best display goes to Kamuela Grown-all those farmers are amazing.”

Graze Your Way maps to guide their tasting str

Attendees used handy Graze Your Way maps to guide their tasting strategy

With over 75 booths to visit-a mix of culinary stations, island-made product sampling, fresh displays by farmers and educational exhibits-there was something for everyone to enjoy. A handy Graze Your Way at Taste map guided attendees through the event. Info collected from booths could be conveniently stowed in canvas Taste bags.

A slew of Hawai’i Community College culinary students from both East and West Hawai’i helped chefs and product booths dish out hundreds of tastes. Also assigned grass-fed cuts of beef to prepare, the future chefs didn’t disappoint, offering Thai Beef Papaya Salad, Beef Stroganoff and Kona Coffee and Wine-Braised Beef. Facebook fans extolled the students’ Banana-Chocolate-Coconut Pops and Lilikoi-Papaya-Ginger Sorbet!

Mahalo to the many others who helped make Taste a success! With a mission to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and support of locally produced ag products, Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations. Find a list of the 2012 supporters and participants, details on the Mealani Research Station-where Taste began-plus where to get grass-fed beef on the Big Isle AND recipes, at www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com. Save the date for next year: Friday, Oct. 4, 2013. Come hungry!

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