Where to Get Grass-Fed Beef on Hawai’i Island

By Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Retailers, Restaurants and Resorts
Retailers are listed in bold.

Info is subject to change. List is alphabetized and divided into geographic areas for convenience. Check with resorts as to which restaurant serves grass-fed beef. To have your biz put on this list, email ferng@hawaii.rr.com. Updated 4-17-2012. Mahalo!

Mauna Lani Resort at Taste 2011EAST SIDE
Honoka’a-Hamakua
JJ’s Country Market, Honoka’a-775-7744
Tex Drive In, Honoka’a-775-0598

Hilo
Bueno Burrito-930-6565
Café Pesto-969-4858
Don’s Grill-935-9099
Hilo Bay Café-935-4939
Hilo Hawaiian Hotel-935-9361
Island Naturals Market & Deli-935-5533
Keaukaha Market-935-5535
KTA Super Stores: Puainako St.- 935-3731, Keawe St.-935-3731
Kuhio Grille-959-2336
Kumyo’s Okazuya-933-1335
Nori’s Saimin & Snacks-935-9133
Sack ‘n Save-935-3113
Verna’s Drive In-935-2776

East Hawai’i-South
Da Store, Hawaiian Beaches (Pahoa)-965-8192
Foodland, Kea’au-966-9316
Island Naturals Market & Deli, Pahoa-965-8322
J Hara Store, Kuristown-966-5462
KOA Shop Kaffee, Mountain View-968-1129
Kaleo’s Restaurant, Pahoa-965-5600
Malama Market, Pahoa-965-2105
Pahoa Cash & Carry-965-8216
Verna’s, Kea’au-966-9288
Verna’s Too, Mountain View-968-8774
Volcano Store, Volcano Village-967-7210

Ka’u
Island Market, Na’alehu-929-7527

Grass Fed Beef at Taste 2011WEST SIDE
North Kohala/Kawaihae
Kahua Ranch-882-7954
Kohala Burger & Taco, Kawaihae Shopping Center-880-1923
M. Nakahara Store, Hawi-889-6359
Takata Store, Hawi-889-5261
Zest Restaurant, Hawi-889-1188

Waimea
Allen’s Table-885-6268
Earl’s Waimea-887-1800
Healthways II, Parker Ranch Center-885-6775
KTA Super Store-885-8866
Mauna Lani Bay Hotel & Bungalows-885-6622
Merriman’s-885-6822
Paniolo Country Inn-885-4377
Red Water Café-885-9299
Village Burger, Parker Ranch Center-885-7319

Kohala Coast/Waikoloa Village
Eddie Aikau Restaurant/Surf Museum, Waikoloa Kings’ Shops-886-8433
The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai’i, Kohala Coast-885-2000
Foodland Farms, Shops at Mauna Lani-887-6101
Four Seasons Resort Hualalai, Ka’upulehu-325-8000
Island Gourmet Market, Waikoloa Queens’ MarketPlace-886-3577
Merriman’s Market Café, Waikoloa Kings’ Shops-886-1700
Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, Kohala Coast, 882-7222
Napua at Mauna Lani Beach Club, Kohala Coast-885-5910
Roy’s Waikoloa Bar & Grill, Waikoloa Kings’ Shops-886-4321
Tommy’s Bahama Restaurant & Bar, Shops at Mauna Lani-881-8686
Waikoloa Grill and Bar, Waikoloa Beach Resort-886-8797
Waikoloa Village Market, Waikoloa Highlands Center-883-1088

Kona
13 Palms, Keauhou Shopping Center-324-1555
Annie’s Island Fresh Burgers, Kainaliu-324-6000
Choice Mart Super Market, Captain Cook-323-3994
El Maguey, Old Industrial Area, Kailua-Kona, 329-0636
Harbor House, Honokohau Marina-326-4166
Holuakoa Café, Holualoa-322-2233
Humpy’s Big Island Ale House, Kailua-Kona-324-2337
Island Lava Java Bistro & Grill, Kailua-Kona-327-2161
Island Naturals Market & Deli: Kailua-Kona-326-1122, Kainaliu-930-7550
Keauhou Beach Resort-332-3441
Kona Natural Foods, Crossroads Center, Kailua-Kona-329-2296
KTA Super Stores: Kailua-Kona-329-1677, Keauhou-322-2311
Mahina Café, Captain Cook-323-3200
Mi’s Italian Bistro, Captain Cook-323-3880
Oshima Brothers Store, Kainaliu-322-3844
Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai, Keauhou Shopping Center-333-3434
Sandy’s Drive In, Kainaliu-322-2161
Ultimate Burger, Kailua-Kona-329-2326
Vista Restaurant at Kona Country Club, Keauhou-322-3700

To Purchase Beef in Bulk
Hawaii Beef Producers, Pa’auilo-776-1109 or JJ’s Country Market, Honoka’a-775-7744
Kahua Ranch, North Kohala-882-4646
Kulana Foods, Hilo-959-9144

To Locate Hawaii Ranchers Hawaiian Red Veal-885-5599

Island Caterers Using Grass-Fed Beef
Chef Kanoa Miura
Chef Devin Lowder
Chef Olelo pa’a Faith Ogawa
Kohala Coast Catering, 880-1541
Sodexo at University of Hawai’i Hilo, 974-7303

Taste of the Hawaiian Range Tips for Purchasing Big Isle Grass-Fed Beef

Save the Date
9.21.2012 for Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range at the Hilton Waikoloa Village

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Where to Get Grass-Fed Beef on Hawai’i Island

Handy Alphabetized List of Retailers and Restaurants 2011
Retailers are listed in bold. Info is subject to change.

EAST SIDE
Honoka‘a-Hamakua
CC Jon’s Snack In Shoppe, Honoka‘a-775-0414
JJ’s Country Market, Honoka‘a-775-7744
Malama Market, Honoka‘a-775-0631

Tex Drive In, Honoka‘a-775-0598

Hilo
Café Pesto-969-4858
Don’s Grill-935-9099

Hilo Bay Cafe Carpaccio

Hilo Bay Cafe Carpaccio

Hilo Bay Café-935-4939
Hilo Hawaiian Hotel’s Queen Court-935-9361
Keaukaha Market-935-5535
Kuhio Grille-959-2336
KTA Super Stores: Puainako St.- 935-3731, Keawe St.-935-3731
Island Naturals Market & Deli-935-5533

Mino’s Restaurant-981-5700
Nori’s Saimin & Snacks-935-9133
Sack ‘n Save-935-3113
Verna’s Drive In-935-2776

East Hawai‘i-South
Da Store, Hawaiian Beaches (Pahoa)-965-8192
Foodland, Kea‘au-966-9316
J Hara Store, Kuristown-966-5462

KOA Shop Kaffee, Mountain View-968-1129
Malama Market, Pahoa-965-2105
Pahoa Cash & Carry-965-8216

Verna’s, Kea‘au-966-9288
Verna’s Too, Mountain View-968-8774
Volcano Store-967-7210

Ka‘u
Island Market, Na‘alehu-929-7527

WEST SIDE
North Kohala
Kahua Ranch-882-7954
Takata Store, Hawi-889-5261

Waimea
Daniel Thiebaut Restaurant-887-2123
Healthways II-885-6775
KTA Super Store-885-8866

Huli Sue’s BBQ & Grill-885-6268
Mauna Lani Bay Hotel & Bungalows-885-6655

Merriman's grass-fed beef

Merriman's grass-fed beef

Merriman’s-885-6822
Paniolo Country Inn-885-4377
Red Water Café-885-9299
Village Burger-885-7319

Kohala Coast/Waikoloa Village
Four Seasons Resort Hualalai-325-8000
Buzz’s Sand Trap, Waikoloa Beach Resort-886-8797
Foodland Farms, Shops at Mauna Lani-887-6101
Island Gourmet Market, Waikoloa Queens’ MarketPlace-886-3577

Merriman’s Market Café, Waikoloa Kings’ Shops-886-1700
Roy’s Waikoloa Bar & Grill, Waikoloa Kings’ Shops-886-4321
Tommy’s Bahama Restaurant & Bar, Mauna Lani Resort-881-8686
Waikoloa Village Market-883-1088

Kona
Choice Mart Super Market, Captain Cook-323-3994
Harbor House, Honokohau Marina-326-4166
Holuakoa Café, Holualoa-322-2233
Humpy’s Big Island Ale House, Kailua-Kona-324-2337
Island Lava Java Bistro & Grill, Kailua-Kona-327-2161
Island Naturals Market & Deli: Kailua-Kona-326-1122, Kainaliu-930-7550
Keauhou Beach Resort-332-3441
Kona Natural Foods, Kailua-Kona-329-2296
KTA Super Stores: Kailua-Kona-329-1677, Keauhou-322-2311

Mi’s Italian Bistro, Captain Cook-323-3880
Oshima Brothers Store, Kainaliu-322-3844
Ultimate Burger, Kailua-Kona-329-2326

To Purchase Beef in Bulk
Hawaii Beef Producers, Pa‘auilo-776-1109 or JJ’s Country Market, Honoka‘a-775-7744
Kahua Ranch, North Kohala-882-4646
Kulana Foods, Hilo-959-9144

Hawaii Grass-fed beef

Hawaii Grass-fed beef

To locate Hawaii Ranchers Hawaiian Red Veal-885-5599

Taste of the Hawaiian Range Tips for Purchasing Big Isle Grass-Fed Beef

Save the Date
9.30.2011 for the 2011 Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range

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Good to the Bone: Making Stock

This week we feature a guest blog by Devany Vickery-Davidson. She shares a stock recipe using local, grass-fed veal bones she purchased at the Waimea farmers market on the Big Isle. A food and travel writer who owned a cooking school for home chefs in Chicago, she lives in Hilo where her passion for great food is part of her blog, www.myhawaiianhome.blogspot.com. Vickery-Davidson also contributes to Ke Ola and Edible Hawaiian Islands magazines and is writing a food-centric novel about the Big Isle. She can be contacted at PineapplePrincess@hawaii.rr.com.

Why I Make Veal Stock

Veal bones

Veal bones with mirepox.

I love veal stock. It is velvety deep and rich and makes most everything taste better. I have been making my own stocks for years, but after I moved to Hawai‘i, I thought I would never find veal bones. Thanks to the folks at Big Island Red Veal, those bones are actually obtainable in Hawai‘i now. About now you are probably asking, “What is the difference between Beef Stock and Veal Stock?” Because the bones are from a young animal they contain more collagen, which when it breaks down into gelatin, gives the veal stock an unparalleled body you just can’t get from older bones. It really is just that simple.

But let me explain it in a simpler way: Beef stock tastes like Grandma’s Beef Stew.
 Veal stock is more velvety than actual velvet. Veal stock is a thing of beauty. 

In the stock department, nothing canned can compare to what you can make at home.  And unless you are buying stock in a gourmet market, you will not be able to buy veal stock at all.  I do not even buy stocks, which are really just broth in boxes, except in dire emergencies.

Veal Stock Method

First you must locate the Veal Bones. I only know one way to do this since I live in Hilo, town without a butcher. Go to the Waimea Farmers Market on the first Saturday of the month. Go early. Buy veal bones from the Hawaiian Red Veal booth.  (For info on local veal, see the Big Isle Grass-fed Beef Producers on our website.)

In the Roasting Pan
This method is for about 10 pounds of bones. You will need a large roasting pan and a very large pot.  Take those bones home and wash them. Then put them in a roasting pan, toss with a tiny bit of olive oil and roast them at 400 degrees for an hour, turning once half way through. Rough chop equal amounts of (about 2 cup each) onions, carrots and celery. Add them to the roasting pan.  Continue roasting for another 30 minutes. Pour in a small can of tomato paste and stir.

Move to the Stock Pot
Put everything into a large stock pot. Deglaze the roasting pan with about 1 cup of water, scraping to gather any caramelized bits on the bottom of the pan. Pour this into the stock pot. Add cold water to the top of the pot. If you wish, you can take some herbs and wrap them in cheesecloth and tie with a string for easy removal. This is called a sachet d’epices. I like to use some rosemary, fennel seeds, parsley stems, peppercorns and a bay leaf.

Don’t Allow Stock to Boil
Rule #1: DO NOT ALLOW THE STOCK TO BOIL! You want to cook the stock, of course, but slowly, at a low simmer. Your house is going to smell lovely for many, many hours. If the stock boils, fat is released into the water and makes a cloudy stock. Simmer the stock on low for about 12-14 hours, occasionally skimming any froth off of the top. Do no stir. At this point you will also need to add water to keep the bones covered.

In this process, you want to end up with about three-fourths of the liquid you started with.  At this point, strain all of the liquid through a cheesecloth-lined sieve into a clean stock pot. Toss all of the solids unless you have dogs that like bones.

Packaged veal stock

Packaged veal stock.

Reducing Stock Deepens Flavors
Now the stock is ready for reducing. This enables the flavors to deepen and it will take up less room in your freezer as well.  Simmer on a high simmer (not boiling) for a few hours, stirring occasionally until the liquid has reduced down to half or less, depending on the depth of flavor you want. I generally reduce mine down by about 75 percent.  Pour into plastic containers and chill on ice. As soon as it has chilled, freeze or refrigerate. It will last refrigerated about a week and frozen about three months.

Photo credits: Devany Vickery-Davidson

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Chef Mavro Weighs In on Grass-Fed Beef

Chef Mavro - Tips on cooking grass-fed beef

Chef George Mavrothalassitis at his acclaimed Honolulu restaurant, Chef Mavro

A founding member of Hawai’i Regional Cuisine in 1991, Chef George Mavrothalassitis has long known the importance of supporting local food producers. A recipient of the prestigious James Beard Foundation award, Chef “Mavro” is well known in the nation’s top culinary circles.

Always Buy Local
Chef cooks with the philosophy: “always buy the best and freshest, buy local, treat all products with great respect and start afresh every season with new ideas and creative recipes.” A native of the French port of Marseilles, Chef grew up hearing the passionate calls of fishmongers and tasting the farm-fresh flavors of southern France.

“Sometimes buying local means the cost is higher and sometimes it takes more time but the reward is huge,” shares Chef Mavro. “Local farmers succeed and my guests enjoy fresh, regional ingredients and a dining experience they could only have in Hawai’i.”

Today, Chef is at the helm of the acclaimed Chef Mavro restaurant in Honolulu, where the menu changes four times a year. A recipient of the AAA Five Diamond Award in both 2009 and 2010, Chef Mavro restaurant is ranked one of the “Top 10 Restaurants in the World” by Fodor’s. It’s a “must” dining experience on O’ahu.

Chef Mavro at Chef Mavro restaurant

Chef Mavro and Chef Kevin Chong in the kitchen at Chef Mavro restaurant

Wagyu Beef
In addition to grass-fed beef, Chef serves grass-fed wagyu beef at his restaurant. Wagyu beef is from cattle that are genetically predisposed to produce meat with intense marbling, resulting in a rich, juicy flavor. Typical to other breeds of cattle fed-and-finished on grass, grass-fed wagyu is better for you-it contains a higher percentage of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than grain-fed beef. Wagyu’s increased marbling, which is high in monounsaturated fats, may actually help people lower their “bad” LDL cholesterol levels while raising their “good” HDL levels.

Taste Cooking Demo
Chef Mavro will do a Cooking Grass-Fed Beef 101 seminar at this year’s Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range. Time is 12:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10 at the Hilton Hawaiian Village. The fee is $10 and attendees will receive a takeaway recipe for creating it at home. The evening Taste extravaganza is 6-8 p.m. Buy tickets for the evening Taste and cooking demo.

Q & A with Chef Mavro
We caught up with chef recently to get one of his fave recipes for using grass-fed beef: Beef Short Rib with Puree of Celery Root. We got to chatting and asked him about using local products, including grass-fed beef…

Q: Why do you like using grass-fed beef?
Chef: I like to support the local economy, number one. And I like the taste.

Q: How do you prepare grass-fed beef at Chef Mavro restaurant?
Chef: We like very much to use grass-fed beef for braised short ribs. We cook it in stock and wine at very low temperature for 3.5 hours. It’s delicious. I braise it this way because braising is the traditional way to cook short ribs. Braising this cut makes the meat tender and the marinade gives it a fantastic flavor.

Q: Is your wagyu beef 100% grass-fed? Where do you get it from and why do you like it?
Chef: Our wagyu beef is grass-fed and from Australia. I like it because of the flavor, the tenderness-you can cut it with a fork-and considering the size of the wagyu, it has some of the best marbling in the world.

Q: You point out several Big Island products on your menu, can you share who they are?
Chef: We use 75 percent of Big Island ingredients in our menus… Hirabara baby greens, hearts of palm, Hamakua mushrooms, Hawaiian Vanilla, Big Island Goat Cheese, Volcano Island honey, and from NELHA: abalone, Kona Cold lobster, sablefish, and our newest offering, Kona Kea Shrimp, which we’re very excited about right now.

Chef Mavro - Sumida watercress farm

Chef Mavro does a demo at the Sumida watercress farm on O'ahu

Q: Can you share any good experiences working direct with Big Isle food providers?
Chef: Yes, yes, yes… always a great experience and such wonderful products. They’ve all become my friends and I go by their farms whenever I can.  I share their stories with our waiters during their pre-service briefings and they pass on those stories to our guests who are very interested in knowing about the source of our ingredients. We brand local ingredients on our menus and our guests really pay attention to what they are eating. And in the last few years so many like to take photos of their plates before they eat! And they go online from their table to post photos and comment on their experience during dinner. This spreads the word about local farms to millions of people!

Q: How many years have you been a participating chef at Taste?  Can you share any experiences using different cuts of meats? Did you learn anything?
Chef: I’ve been involved with Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range since the late 1990s…it’s my favorite event. I got tripe (stomach) one year, which was OK because I love tripe and I did a Filipino tripe stew. One year I was assigned a whole goat and I used a navarin recipe (French lamb stew with turnips, onions, potatoes and carrots-”navet” is French for “turnip”).  It was the first time that I cooked a whole goat in my life and I was suspicious about the result…but it was fantastic.

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